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Alice Gale is now a “Happy Ohm”

After several years of motoring out to the sailing area of Newport Beach I have desired an electric conversion to allow smoother and quieter operation, provide a substitute power source for relaxed cruising with friends, and allow access to the canal homes in our area.   An electric conversion would allow us to significantly expand my local area of exploration. My gas 4.0 motor was not particularly happy at super slow cruising speeds and liked to run at quarter throttle which for the Alice Gale was approaching hull speed.    I desired an electric motor that would have zero to max power available with the twist of a knob or throttle.

I have researched multiple sources for electric propulsion and found a direct solution for my use without significant modification to Alice Gale.   Elco Motor Yachts started distributing 9.9 hp motors that have the exact footprint of my existing 4.0 hp Mercury motor.

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As a reminder to my followers,  my number one usage of Alice Gale is harbor cruising under sail with friends while enjoying the views and a glass of wine with snacks.  Boat speed was never an issue, so a fast responding quick moving sailboat is the opposite of my desires.    Under perfect conditions I wanted a responsive boat that would move comfortable under a range of wind conditions and be stable enough not to concern the captain or passengers of ‘dangerous capsize conditions’.     Alice Gale has always been a responsive and easily driven boat under light to moderate wind conditions.  Under erratic and higher wind conditions greater then 10 knots required more sailing focus from me or reefing to de-power  the boat for comfort sailing.

With this in mind I have been comfortable trading boat acceleration for more stability.

The following photo’s explain my changes to Alice Gale in making her a truly multipurpose boat.  She is rigged for both sail and as an electric launch.

My design updates included adding 550 lbs of lead acid AGM batteries to the center line of the boat.

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This modification has done an excellent job in lowering the waterline on the bow of the boat and raising slightly the stern to match the designed waterline originally intended for the Ebihen 15.  Alice Gale was alway a bit tail heavy and looks better with several passengers sitting up front.  With the added battery weight clearly centered on the boats center the boat sits very comfortable in the water, though it now may be an inch or two overall lower then design.   It has made the boat several inches longer at the waterline, so in reality I have a slight increase in maximum hull speed.    As the owner of the boat I am extremely happy with the changes.

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Alice Gale sitting nicely at the dock with electric propulsion

llSo starting from the beginning of my modification.  After determining by measurement and balance I selected an installation of the batteries directly below my forward seats on  the center balance point of Alice Gale.   I designed and made brackets and a battery shelf to both secure and hide the batteries from normal view.    All of my parts where first constructed with thin ply patterns.   I experimented a number of times to come up with the final shape, shelf height and overall look.

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Brackets cut and notched for cross members

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Removing finish for Epoxy attachment

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Bracket and cross members installed

With the weight of each battery at 61 lbs I made sure I had sufficient cross bracing to support the weight of four batteries.  Each support member is epoxy attached to the adjoining frame.

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Shelf

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Battery support

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More prep

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Adding a door rail

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Door rail detail

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Door rail detail

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Door rail installed

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Prep and paint the shelf brackets

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Shelf installed

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Painted to match hull color

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Dry fitted door panel

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Identified Left/Right side for perfect fit

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First battery install

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Cutouts for Gauges

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Filled old master Switch location

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Master Switch, Amp Meter, and Charger outlet

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Finished look

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Finished look

The tight areas under the seat shelf has the added benefit of allowing stowage of fenders and life jackets without the clutter of being underfoot or hidden away in cabinets.

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Installed charger

I installed NOCO Genius dual 10 amp chargers for each 12v bank.  I hooked up across each 6 volt pair to individually charge two batteries independently from the other batteries in the bank.   Each side of Alice Gale has a similar row of batteries (4 – 210 amp AGM) and a 2 bank 12 volt charger as shown.

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Shunt and bilge pump wiring

I used my previously wired bilge pump and required to a 12V bank.  The lower shunt provides details to the running amp meter from Victron Energy.

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Ready for our first cruise

 

 

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Posted by on June 30, 2016 in Building Stage

 

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A two day sail in San Diego Harbor.

Gail and I trailered “Alice Gale” down to San Diego and spent two days sailing out of Shelter Island.

 
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Posted by on February 2, 2014 in Sailing the Ebihen 15

 

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Setting Sail

Time for some driveway sailing.    I stepped the mast for the first time and set the sails in the driveway.   A few adjustments and “Alice Gale” will be ready for launch.

Mast stepped

Jib and Main set

Aft view

Balanced lug, with jib.

We took “Alice Gale” down to the water to get the centerboard set into its proper location.  Might as well take a quick sail while we’re at it.   Our official launch party is a few weeks away.

Stan and Alice Gale, ready for launch

First (pre) Launch, dropping the center board.

 
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Posted by on August 27, 2011 in Building Stage, Sailing the Ebihen 15

 

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Building a Birdsmouth Mast, Boom, and Yard. (Part One)

Now that the bulk of the build for “Alice Gale” is completed it is time to tackle the birdsmouth mast, boom, and yard.   I am a bit intimidated by building a 20 ft birdsmouth mast but I am moving forward based on the very good information from the Internet on how to build a birdsmouth mast.

First I finished up a few odds and ends with the trailer.  I finished wiring the lights, and added the side bunks.

Side bunk

I used my table saw and band saw to make the 8 boards for the mast.  Each board is scarfed to the required 20 ft length.   Also I tapered each board to create a narrow diameter at both the bottom and top of the mast.

Takes 8 tapered and cut boards for a birdsmouth mast

Next step was building an accurate construction table that was both level and had the right sized forms to hold the mast straight.   You have to build in the taper on the forms too, else you end up with a warped mast.  I used a normal level and a laser leveler to make the building jig with correct level and taper.   Glue up went well doing the work without help.  I used West Slow Hardener and had the necessary time to get the mast together before the resin went off.   I was careful to put the resin in a large flat pan to prevent excess heat from the resin and worked as quickly as possible in painting the resin on.   As long as I quickly spread the resin out I was able to mix several batches of resin as I worked.  It took about 1/2 an hour to complete the entire glue up and alignment checks. Preplan the entire process and it seems to work out ok. If I had screwed up anypart of the glue up I would have had to start over.

Mast table laser alignment

straight line with a laser leveler

mast construction forms, sized for taper

alignment check prior to epoxy glue up

 
The plans do not call for a hollow mast, but at my age I wanted a mast a bit lighter then solid wood. The finished mast weighs in at 29 lbs, (no hardware) and I am pretty satisfied with that.

More shaping and then on to fitting the halyard sheath and eye-bolts for the stays.

Birdsmouth construction with end plug

 
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Posted by on June 14, 2011 in Building Stage

 

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Bowsprit, Centerboard, Rudder, & Trailer Bunk

Took a week off for spring skiing in Vail CO, but found time to work on a few items since loading Alice Gale onto the trailer.

I still have to construct a side guard bunk for the trailer but I finished an underhull bunk that will stabilize the boat during transport.

Stabilizing bunk, major weight on keel.

The bowsprit has a two eyed mastband that was fitted.

Getting the fit just right

Looking rather long with this wide angle view

Varnish work

Started work on the centerboard.  After fairing it will be primed and painted.

Steel Centerboard ready for fairing work

A pin will be added

Hoisting and safety rope holes

The rudder was also sanded and prepped for primer and paint.

A layer of fiberglass sheathing was laid down

Will be adding these Zebrawood Caps to the Centerboard Trunk

 
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Posted by on April 15, 2011 in Building Stage

 

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“Alice Gale” on the trailer

This week I worked on interior details and getting the boat ready for loading on the trailer.  By Friday she was ready for the move from the garage floor onto the trailer.   I used my garage hoist to lift the bow onto a furniture mover and then a couple of car jacks to lift the transom onto another furniture mover.  This allowed for easy mobility of the boat and I was able to swing the bow around toward the garage door.  Once the boat was aligned with the trailer I used the winch on the trailer to pull “Alice Gale” onto the pads.   The trailer design, a tilting bed trailer, made the transfer easier.   A neighbor helped with keeping the boat steady as she was pulled onto the trailer.  I used the same temporary hull stabilizers on the trailer.  I still need to build a permanent runner system for the hull to stabilize loading and transportation needs.   And finally at last, the big question, will the boat fit as planned into the garage.   Like a glove!   I have just enough room to move behind the transom to the rear door and the width of the trailer just fits through the door opening.

Ready to move

Ready to move onto trailer

View from starboard side

A good vantage point view

Wow, it actually fits

 
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Posted by on March 21, 2011 in Building Stage

 

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Floorboards, Fairleads, Locker Doors, and Trim

Here are few more build photo’s from the past month.   I have been working toward finishing the interior of “Alice Gale” for months now.  I think she will be on the trailer within a few weeks.

A fresh coat of UV sealer

Alignment check

The bronze fairleads that I purchased from Classic Marine did not match up cleanly with my round oak rub rail so I needed to fair the rail to fit the fairlead.

Fitting the Fairlead

Rub-rail trimmed to match fairlead shape.

With the canvas deck cover I need to protect the area of the mast partner.  This area will have a few holes drilled for belaying pins, so I cut out a cover from oak.  This will match the color of the gunwale rub-rail when varnished.  Also shown in these photo’s is the forward deck trim.

Oak mast partner cover over canvas

Dry fitting, to be matched to completed mast.

A bit of fairing and filler and it's done

I made my locker door handles out out extra mahogany stock.

Roughing out the door handles

I also added a few new low cost power tools to ease the final building details.

A needed router for my trim work

Table top sander, good for small part shaping

Adding a round curve to trim

Guide fence added to band saw for cutting width of trim

Adding the hardware

fitting of locker doors

View of forward locker

 
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Posted by on March 12, 2011 in Building Stage

 

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